Design Drama

documenting the delicate dance of design

A How To Guide: Credit Card Confetti April 14, 2009

ccconfetti

Supplies:

One Pair of Scissors
Twenty Seven x Infinity parts rage
Three credit cards
One champagne flute

Instructions:

Allow scissors to meet plastic credit cards, apply liberally

– Put champagne flute on desk where bills are paid.
– Stare at it daily as you pay down your credit card bills with money earned
by taking every extra job you can find and putting every penny into a savings
account specifically opened to build the money to pay off these soul sucking
devices.
– when all debt is paid off, in full, empty champagne glass of all credit card confetti, pour a liberal amount of champagne* into glass and drink until champagne magnum is empty.

Prep time: varies
Card cut up process: 3 cards, 30 minutes

Suggested music:
“You Make Me Sick” – Pink
“Money” – Pink Floyd
“9 to 5” – Dolly Parton
“Opportunities (Let’s Make Lots Of Money)” – Pet Shop Boys
“She Works Hard For The Money” – Donna Summer
“Money Changes Everything” – Cyndi Lauper
“Taxman” – The Beatles

*champagne should be paid for with COLD HARD CASH<

 

MacGuyvering Seedlings – Designing a Cheap Solution April 7, 2009

If you know me, you’re aware of what a tree-hugger I can be. I can’t stand the thought of throwing anything in the trash. I’m also frugal.

I’m also a frustrated gardener. Oh, and I like to MacGuyver things.

This year, I decided to try growing tomatoes from seed. I’ve never done it before and just thought I’d give it a shot. The little guys are doing well.

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I’ve seen those little terrarium things that are sold and have never bought one, but had a stroke of genius last night as to how I could finagle my own. I save my plastics (#1 & #2 are picked up by Nashville Metro) — all other labeled numbers of plastics and glass have to be taken to a recycling pick up center. I’d eaten a few take out salads and had saved the containers and they were in the pile. I was gathering my recycling and it struck me that these could be used in the same fashion – to grow seedlings. So, I popped my basil in one as a test and it’s working like a charm.

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The only issue here is they aren’t very deep, but I’ll solve that issue by transplanting them into styrofoam cups and empty half & half cartons I’ve saved.

Nothing goes to waste around here.

 

In Which I Respond to A Craigslist Ad on My Blog February 11, 2009

I’ve been surfing through Craigslist again & I read this little gem this morning: (I’ve bolded my favorite part)

Book designer (XXXXXXX, TN)
Date: 2009-02-11, 9:07AM CST

We are a progressive, up-and-coming book publisher located in the XXXXXXX, Tennessee area. We are showing steady growth this year, and find ourselves in need of a book designer with the following characteristics/qualities:

– Applicant must be familiar/knowledgeable/preferably expert at InDesign software. A knowledge of Quark would be beneficial as well. You will be designing the interiors of books. You will also be given the opportunity to design covers as well.

– A knowledge of Photoshop/Illustrator is a plus, a big plus. You should be able to edit photos and illustrations for use in hardcover/paperback books.

– You should be knowledgeable about of the book industry – how books are produced, distributed, marketed and purchased. You should know what an endpaper is; you should know a mass market paperback from a trade paperback. You must know that (bookstore name redacted) is not a country western duo.

– You will be designing the interior of books – layout, font selection, rules, styles, parts of a book, type, etc. You should be able to provide us with a few samples of your work that is similar in nature.

– You should be able to work at an acceptable rate of speed. Not sloppy fast, but reasonably quickly with an emphasis on quality. We often have deadlines. You must be able to meet them.

– You must not be a flake. You must respond to emails within one day, preferably sooner. You must be available. Projects must be done on time. Always. No exceptions at all. Again, we work on deadlines.

– You must be able to send/store large files easily and securely. You must be able to send files in a PC format. You should be bondable. You must be comfortable handling copyrighted material. You must not lose the material that we give you. You must take this seriously, very seriously. Our authors depend on us.

– You may be asked to correspond with authors directly. You should be able to do so in English, using proper grammar and sentence structure. Some of our authors are rather well-known, and since you will represent us, your writing skills must be up to snuff. You must copy us on all emails. You must know how to correspond with people in a timely and professional manner.

– It would be a plus if you can design book covers, and can provide samples of same.

Benefits:

– In return we can offer little pay [at present], but lots of opportunity for the future. We are growing, and expect to be around for a long, long time.

– You can work out of your home. After all, it’s probably all ready set up as a studio,so you are most comfortable and productive there. No reason to upset the creative boat.

Our emphasis is on quality, beauty, and content. You will be encouraged to learn all you can to keep your skill set fine tuned. Staying ahead of the pack is what it is all about.

Hope to hear from some qualified candidates soon,

(name redacted)

* Location: XXXXXXX TN
* Compensation: Contract per job
* Telecommuting is ok.
* This is a contract job.
* Principals only. Recruiters, please don’t contact this job poster.
* Please, no phone calls about this job!
* Please do not contact job poster about other services, products or commercial interests.

Did you hear a bang earlier? That wasn’t the weather, it was my head exploding.

Look, I get it – we’re in a financial crisis, and everyone is looking to get the maximum amount of work/stuff, etc for a good price. But to write a laundry list of tasks and then have the, for lack of a better word, BALLS to say “we can offer little pay” – well, all I can think is “no wonder they’ve apparently worked with flakes before – ONLY A FLAKE would answer this ad — you’d have to be crazy to sign up for this!” I mean really… why not, when writing this job description, Mr Job Poster, didn’t you say “Cure Cancer” and “Solve Middle East Peace”?

Oh, one of my favorite parts of this ad is how the job poster even went as far as to throw the “celebrity angle” in there in the sentence: Some of our authors are rather well-known. Yawn – Still doesn’t make me want to bite. This makes me realize that only the well-known author and the publisher will make any money even though the designer will be doing the grand majority of the work to make the book marketable to the average customer — after all, we’re the ones that make a book jump off the shelf and grab a consumer’s eye. And in my experience in design, the more cooks you have in the kitchen, so to speak, the more work there is to be done. And the project takes even longer to complete — for the same amount of money, usually.

I’ve looked around at other postings for jobs in other categories other than “art/media/design” and I never seem to find this low-balling fascination when people post jobs in other professions. The reason we chose to be creative is we like to create. Most of us are damn good at it. And, while we might have gotten used to the term “starving artist”, no one is striving to be one. And honestly, I can go work at the mall for more money than this joker is probably offering – AND when I leave the job at the mall they won’t call/email me around the clock – NOR will they expect me to do MORE and MORE work for the same amount of money. That’s almost always the case when a designer low-balls him/herself.

So, to all you job posters out there, with the audacity to write, well, a book of qualifications and job responsibilities like the one above, here’s a newsflash: most reputable designers have a little thing called “self-respect” and we’ve all met your kind before. You are a joke to us. Stories about you become the “worst client ever contest” of storytelling at our cocktail hours. And we’re not flakes either — but people like you, Mr Job Poster, make us so mad that we turn flaky… of course, what you call flaky is what we call “being compensated for the hard work we put forth for piss poor pay.”

After all, the job poster said it himself: Staying ahead of the pack is what it is all about. I suggest all designers stay ahead of the pack by steering clear of “jobs” like this.

UPDATE
The job has been reposted, and now the compensation reads “$100-$300” per book. Seeing as my minimum hourly rate is $75 per hour, I think I’ll pass. I’ve designed brochures for more money.

 

A Little Education about Spec Work / Design Contests January 10, 2009

Every once in a while, I’ll peck around on job listings (cough, Craigslist) and see what’s going on out there. And every once in a while, when things get slow and a project sounds like it has some potential to warrant my time and energy, I’ll even send a response.

This week, I sent a reply to a job listing. It’s for a publication. I attached my resume’ and other information to an email and hoped for the best. I heard nothing, until last night.

I got a reply from the job poster around 7 pm. He apologized for not getting back to me sooner and expressed interest in the type of design I do. Then, here’s the kicker, he asked me to go to the MySpace page for his publication (cough, myspace is dead), view some existing mock ups and create a mock up of my own with supplied photos – so he could see “what my style is.” He even asked “could you throw something together?”

I decided not to reply at that moment. I was a little too hot under the collar. I needed to sleep on it.

This morning, I crafted my reply in a text edit document, tweaked the wording to tone things down, and when it was just right, I hit “send.”

In a nutshell, I told him this:

– I don’t conduct my business in this manner.
– what is being proposed is “spec work” – often disguised as a design contest
– I have over 10 years of experience as a graphic designer, listed the reputable clients I’ve done work for, and told him I would be happy to provide samples of my work so he could “see what my style is”
– what he is asking for is unprofessional as well as unethical

I also linked this website for further reading and education and threw in this for good measure

As designers, not just in my area, but everywhere, we need to put a stop to this. I don’t care what level of the career one is at. Spec work is not only bad for one designer, it is detrimental to all. Do not do it. And educate the client on why this is unacceptable.

A person wouldn’t go to Kroger, Whole Foods and Publix, buy a steak at each and tell the cashier “I’m going to take this steak home, cook it – and if I like your’s best, I’ll come back and pay you for it.”

Design is no different.

 

FGF – Let’s Make Lots of Money January 9, 2009

Filed under: FREE,HA!,I'm jazzed,inspiration,time waster — Beth D @ 3:52 pm
 

2008 – My Favorite Things December 20, 2008

Filed under: FREE,I'm jazzed — Beth D @ 7:33 pm
Tags: , ,

Oprah does this list every year, but who can afford that stuff? Here’s my list of favorite things for 2008:

1. White V Neck Hanes t-shirts
I live in these things. Three to a pack at Target for like $9. And when they get dingy, I cut them up and use them for dust rags.

2. Consignment stores
I didn’t just get thrifty when the economy tanked. I’ve been thrifty for years. I got a pair of BeBe jeans (normally $200) for $10 a few years ago. And yesterday got a pair of Abercrombie and Fitch jeans for $6. I also got a rad pair of pants for $3. Merry Christmas to me. There is absolutely no reason to buy name brand clothes at name brand prices

3. Heated afghan
Ok, it’s really not an afghan. It’s a mini electric blanket type thing. My house is old and drafty and I freeze. I got one of these as a gift from my Mom a few months back. She works in a nursing home and these are a staple with elderly people, as they are generally cold natured as they age. Most nights you can find me on the sofa under mine, with it cranked up to at least medium.

4. Pabst Blue Ribbon
$7.50 a half case. Need I say more?

5. Scarves
In addition to providing warmth, they’re a great way to dress up my uniform of white v-neck t-shirts with jeans. I got one at Steinmart for $6 and another one for $4 at Platos Closet, a local store that sells pre-loved clothing. I love them!

6. The One Dish meal
Cooking for one person can be a buzzkill. I’m a big fan of cooking a big pot of something and eating on it for a day or three. I found this website recently and it’s got tons of options. I”m also a big fan of casseroles, so this is like a goldmine for food ideas. One dish meals are also very economical as well.

7. Mad Men
If you haven’t seen this series on AMC, set in the 1960’s world of advertising, you’re missing out. I don’t have cable, so I had to Netflix it. But it’s worth the wait.

8. Book – “The Last Hours of Ancient Sunlight” by Thom Hartman
I was lent this book by a friend and am halfway through it, but wow, what an eyeopener. I encourage everyone to give this one a read.

9. Seed/Plant Swapping
There is no reason really to buy plants for your yard. I planted a lot of great things last year in my flowerbeds and all the plants were free. I planted hollyhock, cannas, wildflowers, red sunflowers, and a few mole plants last year – all were given to me by friends or neighbors. Check in with people you know that have plants that you like – most are willing to either give you cuttings or seeds.

 

FGF – Old Habits Die Hard December 12, 2008

Forgive me — I’m just marinating in a bit of melancholy from ghosts of boys past – but this soundtrack is amazing.

I love Mick Jaggar too… (and Mr Dave Stewart)